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Sweet Springs Sanitarium

1 Jefferson Lane
Sweet Springs, West Virginia
24941 USA

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Sweet Springs Sanitarium is located in eastern Monroe County.

It is the location of a historic mineral spring resort since the 1700’s.

The Sweet Springs Resort was known as Old Sweet Springs or simply “Old Sweet.”  The first hotel was erected in 1792 by William Lewis. William Lewis was a Revolutionary War veteran. He was the brother of General Andrew Lewis, who commanded Virginia militia at the Battle of Point Pleasant, and of Charles Lewis, who died in that battle. From 1795 to 1807, a Virginia district court representing the counties of Botetourt, Greenbrier, Kanawha, and Montgomery met at the Sweet Springs resort.

The resort flourished from 1820 until the Civil War. In the 1830’s, the present large brick hotel was constructed with columned porticos and was often referred to as The Jefferson Building because of its Jeffersonian design. A second large building and five cottages were erected in 1857. During this time, Sweet Springs was a day’s carriage drive from eight other mineral spring resorts known as the “Virginia Springs’’ of pre-Civil War Virginia. Guests would often visit several mineral springs resorts during the busy summer season to enjoy the water and social life at each. Old Sweet had some famous visitors. Some of the most well known visitors to mention are:
George and Martha Washington
General Lafayette
Chief Justice John Marshall
Jerome Bonaparte
Patrick Henry
James and Dolley Madison
General Robert E. Lee
Presidents Pierce
President Fillmore

In June 1864, the resort was visited by Union forces under the command of General David Hunter. His troops camped in the vicinity of the resort, but there is no record that the buildings were harmed. Sweet Springs continued to attract guests after the Civil War, but many vacationers preferred to go to resorts that were more convenient to the railways.

Old Sweet was operated by William Lewis, and in turn his son and grandson, until 1852, when the financially distressed property was acquired by Allen T. Caperton and Oliver Bierne.

From 1902 to 1920, the Lewis family owned the property again and it operated under several different owners until it went into receivership in 1930.
From 1942 through 1945, Old Sweet operated as a sanitarium for tuberculosis patients.
In 1945, the state of West Virginia purchased the property and established the Andrew S. Rowan Memorial Home for the aged.

The property was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.

A major renovation was undertaken from 1972 to 1975.

The Rowan Home was closed in 1991, and the state turned the facility over to Monroe County to establish a rehabilitation center for substance abuse treatment. The project failed, and in 1996 the former resort was sold into private hands.

In 2005, Sweet Springs was sold again, and the new owner hoped to restore the resort to its former glory but sadly passed away unexpectedly before being able to accomplish the restoration.

The resort was auctioned to Ashby Berkley on November 12, 2015, along with equipment and facilities to bottle the famous Sweet Springs mineral water, for $560,000.

Sweet Springs Sanitarium is located in eastern Monroe County.

It is the location of a historic mineral spring resort since the 1700’s.

The Sweet Springs Resort was known as Old Sweet Springs or simply “Old Sweet.”  The first hotel was erected in 1792 by William Lewis. William Lewis was a Revolutionary War veteran. He was the brother of General Andrew Lewis, who commanded Virginia militia at the Battle of Point Pleasant, and of Charles Lewis, who died in that battle. From 1795 to 1807, a Virginia district court representing the counties of Botetourt, Greenbrier, Kanawha, and Montgomery met at the Sweet Springs resort.

The resort flourished from 1820 until the Civil War. In the 1830’s, the present large brick hotel was constructed with columned porticos and was often referred to as The Jefferson Building because of its Jeffersonian design. A second large building and five cottages were erected in 1857. During this time, Sweet Springs was a day’s carriage drive from eight other mineral spring resorts known as the “Virginia Springs’’ of pre-Civil War Virginia. Guests would often visit several mineral springs resorts during the busy summer season to enjoy the water and social life at each. Old Sweet had some famous visitors. Some of the most well known visitors to mention are:
George and Martha Washington
General Lafayette
Chief Justice John Marshall
Jerome Bonaparte
Patrick Henry
James and Dolley Madison
General Robert E. Lee
Presidents Pierce
President Fillmore

In June 1864, the resort was visited by Union forces under the command of General David Hunter. His troops camped in the vicinity of the resort, but there is no record that the buildings were harmed. Sweet Springs continued to attract guests after the Civil War, but many vacationers preferred to go to resorts that were more convenient to the railways.

Old Sweet was operated by William Lewis, and in turn his son and grandson, until 1852, when the financially distressed property was acquired by Allen T. Caperton and Oliver Bierne.

From 1902 to 1920, the Lewis family owned the property again and it operated under several different owners until it went into receivership in 1930.
From 1942 through 1945, Old Sweet operated as a sanitarium for tuberculosis patients.
In 1945, the state of West Virginia purchased the property and established the Andrew S. Rowan Memorial Home for the aged.

The property was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.

A major renovation was undertaken from 1972 to 1975.

The Rowan Home was closed in 1991, and the state turned the facility over to Monroe County to establish a rehabilitation center for substance abuse treatment. The project failed, and in 1996 the former resort was sold into private hands.

In 2005, Sweet Springs was sold again, and the new owner hoped to restore the resort to its former glory but sadly passed away unexpectedly before being able to accomplish the restoration.

The resort was auctioned to Ashby Berkley on November 12, 2015, along with equipment and facilities to bottle the famous Sweet Springs mineral water, for $560,000.

Sweet Springs Sanitarium is located in eastern Monroe County.

It is the location of a historic mineral spring resort since the 1700’s.

The Sweet Springs Resort was known as Old Sweet Springs or simply “Old Sweet.”  The first hotel was erected in 1792 by William Lewis. William Lewis was a Revolutionary War veteran. He was the brother of General Andrew Lewis, who commanded Virginia militia at the Battle of Point Pleasant, and of Charles Lewis, who died in that battle. From 1795 to 1807, a Virginia district court representing the counties of Botetourt, Greenbrier, Kanawha, and Montgomery met at the Sweet Springs resort.

The resort flourished from 1820 until the Civil War. In the 1830’s, the present large brick hotel was constructed with columned porticos and was often referred to as The Jefferson Building because of its Jeffersonian design. A second large building and five cottages were erected in 1857. During this time, Sweet Springs was a day’s carriage drive from eight other mineral spring resorts known as the “Virginia Springs’’ of pre-Civil War Virginia. Guests would often visit several mineral springs resorts during the busy summer season to enjoy the water and social life at each. Old Sweet had some famous visitors. Some of the most well known visitors to mention are:
George and Martha Washington
General Lafayette
Chief Justice John Marshall
Jerome Bonaparte
Patrick Henry
James and Dolley Madison
General Robert E. Lee
Presidents Pierce
President Fillmore

In June 1864, the resort was visited by Union forces under the command of General David Hunter. His troops camped in the vicinity of the resort, but there is no record that the buildings were harmed. Sweet Springs continued to attract guests after the Civil War, but many vacationers preferred to go to resorts that were more convenient to the railways.

Old Sweet was operated by William Lewis, and in turn his son and grandson, until 1852, when the financially distressed property was acquired by Allen T. Caperton and Oliver Bierne.

From 1902 to 1920, the Lewis family owned the property again and it operated under several different owners until it went into receivership in 1930.
From 1942 through 1945, Old Sweet operated as a sanitarium for tuberculosis patients.
In 1945, the state of West Virginia purchased the property and established the Andrew S. Rowan Memorial Home for the aged.

The property was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.

A major renovation was undertaken from 1972 to 1975.

The Rowan Home was closed in 1991, and the state turned the facility over to Monroe County to establish a rehabilitation center for substance abuse treatment. The project failed, and in 1996 the former resort was sold into private hands.

In 2005, Sweet Springs was sold again, and the new owner hoped to restore the resort to its former glory but sadly passed away unexpectedly before being able to accomplish the restoration.

The resort was auctioned to Ashby Berkley on November 12, 2015, along with equipment and facilities to bottle the famous Sweet Springs mineral water, for $560,000.

Sweet Springs Sanitarium is located in eastern Monroe County.

It is the location of a historic mineral spring resort since the 1700’s.

The Sweet Springs Resort was known as Old Sweet Springs or simply “Old Sweet.”  The first hotel was erected in 1792 by William Lewis. William Lewis was a Revolutionary War veteran. He was the brother of General Andrew Lewis, who commanded Virginia militia at the Battle of Point Pleasant, and of Charles Lewis, who died in that battle. From 1795 to 1807, a Virginia district court representing the counties of Botetourt, Greenbrier, Kanawha, and Montgomery met at the Sweet Springs resort.

The resort flourished from 1820 until the Civil War. In the 1830’s, the present large brick hotel was constructed with columned porticos and was often referred to as The Jefferson Building because of its Jeffersonian design. A second large building and five cottages were erected in 1857. During this time, Sweet Springs was a day’s carriage drive from eight other mineral spring resorts known as the “Virginia Springs’’ of pre-Civil War Virginia. Guests would often visit several mineral springs resorts during the busy summer season to enjoy the water and social life at each. Old Sweet had some famous visitors. Some of the most well known visitors to mention are:
George and Martha Washington
General Lafayette
Chief Justice John Marshall
Jerome Bonaparte
Patrick Henry
James and Dolley Madison
General Robert E. Lee
Presidents Pierce
President Fillmore

In June 1864, the resort was visited by Union forces under the command of General David Hunter. His troops camped in the vicinity of the resort, but there is no record that the buildings were harmed. Sweet Springs continued to attract guests after the Civil War, but many vacationers preferred to go to resorts that were more convenient to the railways.

Old Sweet was operated by William Lewis, and in turn his son and grandson, until 1852, when the financially distressed property was acquired by Allen T. Caperton and Oliver Bierne.

From 1902 to 1920, the Lewis family owned the property again and it operated under several different owners until it went into receivership in 1930.
From 1942 through 1945, Old Sweet operated as a sanitarium for tuberculosis patients.
In 1945, the state of West Virginia purchased the property and established the Andrew S. Rowan Memorial Home for the aged.

The property was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.

A major renovation was undertaken from 1972 to 1975.

The Rowan Home was closed in 1991, and the state turned the facility over to Monroe County to establish a rehabilitation center for substance abuse treatment. The project failed, and in 1996 the former resort was sold into private hands.

In 2005, Sweet Springs was sold again, and the new owner hoped to restore the resort to its former glory but sadly passed away unexpectedly before being able to accomplish the restoration.

The resort was auctioned to Ashby Berkley on November 12, 2015, along with equipment and facilities to bottle the famous Sweet Springs mineral water, for $560,000.

Sweet Springs Sanitarium is located in eastern Monroe County.

It is the location of a historic mineral spring resort since the 1700’s.

The Sweet Springs Resort was known as Old Sweet Springs or simply “Old Sweet.”  The first hotel was erected in 1792 by William Lewis. William Lewis was a Revolutionary War veteran. He was the brother of General Andrew Lewis, who commanded Virginia militia at the Battle of Point Pleasant, and of Charles Lewis, who died in that battle. From 1795 to 1807, a Virginia district court representing the counties of Botetourt, Greenbrier, Kanawha, and Montgomery met at the Sweet Springs resort.

The resort flourished from 1820 until the Civil War. In the 1830’s, the present large brick hotel was constructed with columned porticos and was often referred to as The Jefferson Building because of its Jeffersonian design. A second large building and five cottages were erected in 1857. During this time, Sweet Springs was a day’s carriage drive from eight other mineral spring resorts known as the “Virginia Springs’’ of pre-Civil War Virginia. Guests would often visit several mineral springs resorts during the busy summer season to enjoy the water and social life at each. Old Sweet had some famous visitors. Some of the most well known visitors to mention are:
George and Martha Washington
General Lafayette
Chief Justice John Marshall
Jerome Bonaparte
Patrick Henry
James and Dolley Madison
General Robert E. Lee
Presidents Pierce
President Fillmore

In June 1864, the resort was visited by Union forces under the command of General David Hunter. His troops camped in the vicinity of the resort, but there is no record that the buildings were harmed. Sweet Springs continued to attract guests after the Civil War, but many vacationers preferred to go to resorts that were more convenient to the railways.

Old Sweet was operated by William Lewis, and in turn his son and grandson, until 1852, when the financially distressed property was acquired by Allen T. Caperton and Oliver Bierne.

From 1902 to 1920, the Lewis family owned the property again and it operated under several different owners until it went into receivership in 1930.
From 1942 through 1945, Old Sweet operated as a sanitarium for tuberculosis patients.
In 1945, the state of West Virginia purchased the property and established the Andrew S. Rowan Memorial Home for the aged.

The property was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.

A major renovation was undertaken from 1972 to 1975.

The Rowan Home was closed in 1991, and the state turned the facility over to Monroe County to establish a rehabilitation center for substance abuse treatment. The project failed, and in 1996 the former resort was sold into private hands.

In 2005, Sweet Springs was sold again, and the new owner hoped to restore the resort to its former glory but sadly passed away unexpectedly before being able to accomplish the restoration.

The resort was auctioned to Ashby Berkley on November 12, 2015, along with equipment and facilities to bottle the famous Sweet Springs mineral water, for $560,000.

Sweet Springs Sanitarium is located in eastern Monroe County.

It is the location of a historic mineral spring resort since the 1700’s.

The Sweet Springs Resort was known as Old Sweet Springs or simply “Old Sweet.”  The first hotel was erected in 1792 by William Lewis. William Lewis was a Revolutionary War veteran. He was the brother of General Andrew Lewis, who commanded Virginia militia at the Battle of Point Pleasant, and of Charles Lewis, who died in that battle. From 1795 to 1807, a Virginia district court representing the counties of Botetourt, Greenbrier, Kanawha, and Montgomery met at the Sweet Springs resort.

The resort flourished from 1820 until the Civil War. In the 1830’s, the present large brick hotel was constructed with columned porticos and was often referred to as The Jefferson Building because of its Jeffersonian design. A second large building and five cottages were erected in 1857. During this time, Sweet Springs was a day’s carriage drive from eight other mineral spring resorts known as the “Virginia Springs’’ of pre-Civil War Virginia. Guests would often visit several mineral springs resorts during the busy summer season to enjoy the water and social life at each. Old Sweet had some famous visitors. Some of the most well known visitors to mention are:
George and Martha Washington
General Lafayette
Chief Justice John Marshall
Jerome Bonaparte
Patrick Henry
James and Dolley Madison
General Robert E. Lee
Presidents Pierce
President Fillmore

In June 1864, the resort was visited by Union forces under the command of General David Hunter. His troops camped in the vicinity of the resort, but there is no record that the buildings were harmed. Sweet Springs continued to attract guests after the Civil War, but many vacationers preferred to go to resorts that were more convenient to the railways.

Old Sweet was operated by William Lewis, and in turn his son and grandson, until 1852, when the financially distressed property was acquired by Allen T. Caperton and Oliver Bierne.

From 1902 to 1920, the Lewis family owned the property again and it operated under several different owners until it went into receivership in 1930.
From 1942 through 1945, Old Sweet operated as a sanitarium for tuberculosis patients.
In 1945, the state of West Virginia purchased the property and established the Andrew S. Rowan Memorial Home for the aged.

The property was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.

A major renovation was undertaken from 1972 to 1975.

The Rowan Home was closed in 1991, and the state turned the facility over to Monroe County to establish a rehabilitation center for substance abuse treatment. The project failed, and in 1996 the former resort was sold into private hands.

In 2005, Sweet Springs was sold again, and the new owner hoped to restore the resort to its former glory but sadly passed away unexpectedly before being able to accomplish the restoration.

The resort was auctioned to Ashby Berkley on November 12, 2015, along with equipment and facilities to bottle the famous Sweet Springs mineral water, for $560,000.

Cindie Harper serves as the Director of Historic and Paranormal Research for Sweet Springs Resort Park Foundation. She is the Founder and Administrator of Sweet Springs Sanitarium.  Prior to joining the Foundation, Cindie is the Chief Executive Officer of Harpers Global LLC and has over fourteen years of experience within Ambulatory Operations at one of the largest medical facilities in the tri-state area. Cindie is currently the Chapter Regent for the West Virginia Woodburn Chapter of the National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution (NSDAR) and was appointed as the NSDAR West Virginia State Chairman of Patriot Records Project. Cindie has over twenty five years of research experience and more than twenty years of experience in public relations, event organization and media campaigns with philanthropic organizations in Virginia, Hawaii and West Virginia. She earned a bachelor and master of social work from West Virginia University.

Cindie Harper grew up in West Virginia. In early childhood, Cindie experienced seeing mist-like apparitions and poltergeist-type activity. Her interest peaked exponentially after accidentally witnessing an exorcism. Experiencing such a dark, terrifying event at a young age left an insatiable desire for knowledge of the unknown and this is where her journey into the unknown began. As a child, she conducted her own paranormal experiments using cassette recorders, baby powder, and other primitive techniques. Over the years, Cindie has become one of the most respected female paranormal researchers in the field. Cindie is open minded and innovative in her approach to life. This extends into her paranormal interests as well. She is always testing new and experimental equipment and was the first female paranormal researcher to collaborate on the development of the first female branded mobile app spirit box, also known as The Femme Force Edition Hellbox by Appydroid.

Cindie’s professional background in sociology and the medical field provides a very realistic, logical approach to her work in the paranormal field. Cindie Harper serves as the Director of Historic and Paranormal Research for Sweet Springs Resort Park Foundation and is the founder of paranormal events and is Administrator of Sweet Springs Sanitarium.  Prior to joining the Foundation, Cindie is the Chief Executive Officer of Harpers Global LLC and has over fourteen years of experience within Ambulatory Operations in the largest medical facility in the tri-state area. Cindie is currently the Chapter Regent for the West Virginia Woodburn Chapter of the National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution (NSDAR) and was appointed as the NSDAR West Virginia State Chairman of Patriot Records Project. Cindie has over twenty eight years of research experience and more than twenty years of experience in public relations, event organization and media campaigns with historic preservation and philanthropic organizations in Virginia, Hawaii and West Virginia. She earned a bachelor and master of social work from West Virginia University. Cindie also received her Reiki Master/Teacher training in 2002 in Hawaii through the International Center for Reiki Training. She actively pursues knowledge on metaphysics and spiritual development.

Cindie has been a featured guest at numerous conventions, shows and podcasts within the paranormal and horror genres.  Cindie won the title of Ms. Daring Dames of Disincarnate for the years of 2015, 2016 and 2018.

Cindie is known for her straight shooting approach and avant-garde techniques for exploring the unknown. She often explores some of America’s most haunted locations alone. However, it is not unusual to find her collaborating with other members of the paranormal community who embrace innovative ideas for exploring the unknown. When she isn’t sharing her experiences LIVE via video or podcast shows, you can find her written accounts featured on several paranormal and horror media outlets. Cindie is also a published Author. When she is not working on paranormal research projects, historical research and preservation projects, or advocating and honoring Veterans, she can be found spending time with family and close friends, traveling to random places, or relaxing by a beach.

Cindie is a true philanthropist and advocate for those who don’t have a voice. Her compassion for humanity spills over into her personal life. Her two published books are written about two pauper cemeteries located in West Virginia. These cemeteries are filled with the bodies of people who were often poor, victims of violent crimes and unidentified, ill, unknown, beaten down and alone in life and now in death. Most are buried without markers in mass graves. Her books identified as many as possible and acknowledged them so that they too, will be remembered. A voice for those without one.

 

You can purchase her books on Amazon at the following links:

Monongalia County Cemetery in Morgantown West Virginia:

https://www.amazon.com/Monongalia-Cemetery-Morgantown-Virginia-1928-1955/dp/173396570X/ref=monarch_sidesheet

Rowan Memorial Cemetery in Monroe County, West Virginia:

https://www.amazon.com/Memorial-Cemetery-Monroe-County-Virginia/dp/1733965726/ref=kwrp_li_std_nodl

 

Follow Cindie on Social Media:

Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Cynthia-Harper/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/cindieharperofficial

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cindieharperofficial

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com › cindieharperofficial

Website: www.sweetspringssanitarium.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com › harpersglobal

 

Sweet Springs Sanitarium:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hauntedsweetsprings/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/sweetspringssan

Instagram: @sweetspringssanitarium

Website: www.sweetspringssanitarium.com

 

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Date added: Sep/02/2021 | Last time updated: Sep/02/2021

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